Lactation Management Training: From Novice to Expert

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"It was going natural as well as with my 1st baby, but things did not seem to be well. Lots of pain, suffering with each feed, frustration and upset most of the time wondering what's going on? It was an easy issue with chronic suffer. It was poor latch. This tiny baby of 35 wks gestation couldn't latch appropriately causing crushing of the nipples and inducing sever pain. Thanks God it was resolved within few days after correction. After 10 months, I received a training of breastfeeding management I found that it was poor latch. Here came the passion to help other moms who are suffering for nothing and decided to become an IBCLC."

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'I became a pediatrician because I wanted to help children and their families. After almost a decade spent in private practice, I realized that I would never have enough time to properly support my breastfeeding babies and their mothers in a busy practice. Ten minutes per appointment is not enough, especially for a newborn or infant who is having problems breastfeeding! I decided to become Board Certified as a Lactation Consultant. Now, I have a job where I get to spend one hour with new babies and their mothers and can have appropriate follow ups. I feel amazing that I can help mothers not give up on breastfeeding and give their babies all of the benefits we know they get through breastmilk, or "liquid gold!"'

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I am a birth coach, Lactation Consultant, physician, a mother of two. I failed to breastfeed my first born, despite of all my resolves and intentions. It was a matter of great disappointment for me being a physician to not be able to breastfeed. When my next child was born, the situation was the same. Luckily, there was internet then & I found great info and read stories of women who like me had struggled with breastfeeding. All this info and my efforts finally made me feed my younger child exclusively on the breast for six months. I and she decided to wean when she was almost three. My own experiences with breastfeeding made me volunteer to support fellow moms and I started helping other women breastfeed successfully. This led me to formally study breastfeeding and certification as an LC.

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I was a breastfeeding mother. I have two children who are now 10 & 8. What motivated me to do the CLC course was the fact that I got loads of advice from everyone but many of it was wrong information. I wanted to go out and help other moms like me by giving them the right information and helping them when they need it. I also realized there was not much help in this field in my country, India. I would like to help mothers make an informed choice of what is best for them and their babies.

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"Given a chance, I could have been a Lactation specialist right from the word go. 
Having an exposure with HIV positive mothers for over seven years,and I could discharge HIV negative breastfed babies from the program, I wanted to empower all moms regardless of the HIV status to make informed decisions about how to feed the baby. Impact with the breastfeeding goals, armed with good and adequate information, and most of all, with compassion and love."

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My name is Bobbi Jo Hudson and I have worked in a busy pediatric office as a LPN for the past 14 years. I work under 9 providers and we are located in the hospital but a separate practice. The lactation consultants within the hospital stay very busy and can not see all of our nursing moms after they are discharged. The need for lactation services is great due to the volume of patients we have in our practice. First time nursing moms become easily discouraged when there is a breast feeding issue and often times just need to discuss it with a professional. It has become a passion of mine to provide additional assistance to our mothers who are breast feeding and hopefully will be an asset to the practice. I am new to the program and hope to have this complete by May!

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"My son was born with a recessed chin, he was jaundice. I didn't understand why breastfeeding was so painful. He latched the best that he could with his recessed chin. I saw countless Lcs and Dr.s who told me that bf would never work for us. I pumped for 6 months, I continued to latch my son several times a day even though there was little to no milk transfer and endless pain even with a shield. At 6 mo my son started to latch with less pain.. We had thrush twice. We have overcome so much so that my sweet boy would have all the amazing benefits of my milk. We are at a year and still going strong. I aspire to become an LC to provide knowledge, experience and support to breastfeeding mothers. I am so passionate about bf and I want to help guide other mothers through their beautiful journey."

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I'm in the process of pursuing IBCLC certification. My third baby struggled from day one. I was baffled- I had the benefit of success and experience on my side! This wasn't supposed to happen! With the patient, gracious help of my favorite IBCLC, we persisted. I learned what it is like to live through undiagnosed medical problems (hello, tongue tie!) and supplementation in the face of severe breastfeeding problems. We surpassed every nursing goal I had by breastfeeding until 23 months! I'm a Registered Dietitian. I believed in breastfeeding before I ever had my babies, but through this experience, I learned that I have a great passion for lactation. I am eager to complete my remaining requirements to join the ranks of IBCLCs!

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I started Nursing at a very young age and still I have several years to work. My experience includes 30+ years working OB. What a wonderful way to finish my last trimester than helping new Mom's to perfect their God given ability to nourish their babies.

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I was a 22 yr old, first-time parent in 1988. My own mom told me that breastfeeding was "just a fad" --but the price of formula- at SIX dollars a can was too much for my budget.


The only support I got was from one kind nurse. I can still see her eyes smiling above her mask. She had a slight German accent and reminded me of my grandmother.


My first child breastfed for 13 months despite my return to difficult full-time work 8 weeks postpartum. Later, WIC hired me to assist the Deaf and Hard of Hearing community as a peer counselor and eventually to help staff the first Government- funded Breastfeeding clinic in the Southwest.

I became a proud IBCLC in 1999.
My mom is now grandmother to 3 healthy breastfed grandkids and a vociferous proponent of this "fad". :)

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My first baby, born in 1975, was premature at 34 weeks gestation, cared for in an excellent NICU for its time. There was little communication to parents, no visits into the unit, no contact with baby until discharge, no mention of how you might intend to feed your baby. It was understood that breastfeeding was too hard for premies, and no mention of breastmilk by pumping. After 18 days, I took home a tiny "puker", allergic to most formula tried in the first year. I became an NICU nurse in 1978, began to hear about benefits of breastmilk, was exposed to a two day course on brestfeeding in 1999, that led to my becoming certified. That was only the open door. Lactation affords me opportunity to support breastfeeding, mother the mom, and fulfill my mission to God for this calling.

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I breastfed my first 2 children with ease for almost 9mo each. When I had my third child I got a very serious nipple wound from improperly pumping. Every time I nursed my daughter it would tear open and bleed. I didn't know what to do or how to help myself. I kept thinking that if I just placed her properly on my breast it would heal.I was up day and night, reading, researching and trying to figure out how to help myself but it kept getting worse. I remember calling LLL and asking if someone could come out and help me, they could offer me phone advice but I needed someone to come to me. I was too tired to go out and get help. I did get that help, and went on to nurse my daughter for over a year. I became an IBCLC to help women in their homes, but am still based in the hospital!

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“Be the change you wish to see in the world” This statement has been my go to through many times throughout my life, so it seemed only natural that I looked to it when I sat and thought...what do I want to do with my life? What change do I want to see in the world?
It was when I was two months postpartum with my second child that this answer came flooding into my life. My best friend had just had her first child and there she was sitting on the couch with her newborn with the look of defeat plastered all over her face. The same dreaded face that I have come to recognize all too quickly with many of my patients ... Her son would not latch onto the breast. Though I had a few months of breastfeeding under my belt, I lacked the education, verbiage, and overall counseling techniques to get her through this hurdle. I was at a loss as how I could help. I knew that I loved breastfeeding my child more than anything, the look of contentment, sedation, love and purity that came from him each time he fed, I knew that I wanted her to experience that same feeling, especially since she wanted it so badly. Be the change...I decided then that she was my muse to my new found path. I delved right into how I could be the change I wanted to see in this world, where women who chose to breastfeed had the support, guidance, alliance and encouragement they needed to reach their goals. I earned a BS in Maternal and Child Health with a concentration in Human Lactation; from there I earned my IBCLC. I became the change I wanted to see in this world, and now my new mantra to each patient I see has become, "my goal is to help you achieve yours, whether its three days, three months or three years, I will support you”. Never would I have thought that a profession could feed your soul as much as this one does, but each day I am reminded of that enrichment by the sighs of relief after a successful feeding, a mother’s soft gaze into her newborns eyes and the empowerment she feels when our consult ends. I have become what I set out to be!

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At the age of 24, I delivered my twins at 37 weeks. I thought I would "try" breastfeeding like so many moms say they will. Babies were expensive and so was formula. Luck was on my side, I had a wonderful nurse who helped me get off to a great start. After we were home, a public health nurse came weekly to visit and offer assistance. Sometimes she'd just sit in my living room; her presence was enough to give me the confidence I needed to feed my babies. I watched them grow and thrive on my milk. By the time they were 8 months old I knew I wanted to help other women like the nurse that had helped me. Breastfeeding wasn't just feeding, it was a way of parenting. I couldn't imagine things any other way. With the nurses support, I became an LLL Leader & 3 years later an IBCLC.

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Why an LC?
I read everything I could about breastfeeding before the birth of my first child. He would not nurse in the hospital, and I was told I was starving my baby. At one point he was brought to me and spit up formula, despite me having told them he was to be exclusively breastfed. My anger which I was unable to articulate at that time turned to research and study about breastfeeding. I nursed my son for a year. I’ve dedicated my professional career to breastfeeding women and their babies. It is great to see the progress that has been made.

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"My name is Maria. When I had my child 26 years ago, I had a little experience about breastfeeding since I was living in Cuba. When I came to the U.S in 2001, I was hired a year after, I'm start knowing how beneficial in breastfeeding a baby beyond a year, I felt regret that I couldn't do it. My reward was my daughter who I educated her while she was pregnant with her first baby. After knowing all the great benefits, she was determine to breastfeed and yeah she did for 19 mo. My grand baby has very strong immune system, smart and a bright girl. That's the reason that motivated me to dream to became Lactation Consultant and also be able to help my community."

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I have had the privilege of helping mothers and babies for approximately 28 years now. I always share with my Moms that the reason I most likely became an IBCLC is because of the bad experience I had with struggling to breastfeed my first child (now age 30). I was a young mom and although I had read about breastfeeding, I like so many other people believed breastfeeding is a natural thing - you just put the baby at the breast and it sucks. How hard can that be?

As a young mom in the hospital I was trying my best. My nipples were cracked and bleeding and as I was crying and trying to nurse my baby my nurse said, "You are starving that poor baby...give her a bottle.” As a result, we struggled for months with low supply. I was determined no other new mom should ever feel that way!

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For me, becoming an LC was a natural evolution. Growing up I only once saw a woman breastfeeding. Yet, coming of age in the time of Women's Liberation and starting as a Nurse Practitioner in a rural mountain community, it seemed the natural, healthy and right thing to do. I was blessed with two babies who latched on with ease and never gave me a minute's trouble until, when my second child was 17 months old, an abscess and surgery brought an abrupt, sorrowful end to breastfeeding. I had the pleasure of knowing, being assisted by and learning from a fabulous role model - Mary Rose Tully. There is nothing more rewarding than the joy on a Mom's face, and Dad's too, when together we solve a problem, Mom is no longer in pain, their baby eats with gusto and then looks deeply into Mom's eyes.

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In 1985, I was a La Leche League Leader of 11 years and knew that some mothers needed another level of care in addition to what I was providing. The development of IBLCE occurred as I was choosing to re-enter the work force. My life has been so enriched by the mothers I have helped, the support of my peers and the other professionals who accepted my expertise. I hope it will continue to evolve to the original plan: A stand-alone profession such as physical therapy or optometry, which can provide expert care unequaled by any other health care profession.

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In February, I had my first child and knew very little about breastfeeding. From the first time I held her, she latched on perfectly. I then became very passionate about making sure every mother and baby had the same opportunity that we had.

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