Lactation Management Training: From Novice to Expert

Lactation Education Resources Blog

I was a 22 yr old, first-time parent in 1988. My own mom told me that breastfeeding was "just a fad" --but the price of formula- at SIX dollars a can was too much for my budget.


The only support I got was from one kind nurse. I can still see her eyes smiling above her mask. She had a slight German accent and reminded me of my grandmother.


My first child breastfed for 13 months despite my return to difficult full-time work 8 weeks postpartum. Later, WIC hired me to assist the Deaf and Hard of Hearing community as a peer counselor and eventually to help staff the first Government- funded Breastfeeding clinic in the Southwest.

I became a proud IBCLC in 1999.
My mom is now grandmother to 3 healthy breastfed grandkids and a vociferous proponent of this "fad". :)

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My first baby, born in 1975, was premature at 34 weeks gestation, cared for in an excellent NICU for its time. There was little communication to parents, no visits into the unit, no contact with baby until discharge, no mention of how you might intend to feed your baby. It was understood that breastfeeding was too hard for premies, and no mention of breastmilk by pumping. After 18 days, I took home a tiny "puker", allergic to most formula tried in the first year. I became an NICU nurse in 1978, began to hear about benefits of breastmilk, was exposed to a two day course on brestfeeding in 1999, that led to my becoming certified. That was only the open door. Lactation affords me opportunity to support breastfeeding, mother the mom, and fulfill my mission to God for this calling.

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I breastfed my first 2 children with ease for almost 9mo each. When I had my third child I got a very serious nipple wound from improperly pumping. Every time I nursed my daughter it would tear open and bleed. I didn't know what to do or how to help myself. I kept thinking that if I just placed her properly on my breast it would heal.I was up day and night, reading, researching and trying to figure out how to help myself but it kept getting worse. I remember calling LLL and asking if someone could come out and help me, they could offer me phone advice but I needed someone to come to me. I was too tired to go out and get help. I did get that help, and went on to nurse my daughter for over a year. I became an IBCLC to help women in their homes, but am still based in the hospital!

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“Be the change you wish to see in the world” This statement has been my go to through many times throughout my life, so it seemed only natural that I looked to it when I sat and thought...what do I want to do with my life? What change do I want to see in the world?
It was when I was two months postpartum with my second child that this answer came flooding into my life. My best friend had just had her first child and there she was sitting on the couch with her newborn with the look of defeat plastered all over her face. The same dreaded face that I have come to recognize all too quickly with many of my patients ... Her son would not latch onto the breast. Though I had a few months of breastfeeding under my belt, I lacked the education, verbiage, and overall counseling techniques to get her through this hurdle. I was at a loss as how I could help. I knew that I loved breastfeeding my child more than anything, the look of contentment, sedation, love and purity that came from him each time he fed, I knew that I wanted her to experience that same feeling, especially since she wanted it so badly. Be the change...I decided then that she was my muse to my new found path. I delved right into how I could be the change I wanted to see in this world, where women who chose to breastfeed had the support, guidance, alliance and encouragement they needed to reach their goals. I earned a BS in Maternal and Child Health with a concentration in Human Lactation; from there I earned my IBCLC. I became the change I wanted to see in this world, and now my new mantra to each patient I see has become, "my goal is to help you achieve yours, whether its three days, three months or three years, I will support you”. Never would I have thought that a profession could feed your soul as much as this one does, but each day I am reminded of that enrichment by the sighs of relief after a successful feeding, a mother’s soft gaze into her newborns eyes and the empowerment she feels when our consult ends. I have become what I set out to be!

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At the age of 24, I delivered my twins at 37 weeks. I thought I would "try" breastfeeding like so many moms say they will. Babies were expensive and so was formula. Luck was on my side, I had a wonderful nurse who helped me get off to a great start. After we were home, a public health nurse came weekly to visit and offer assistance. Sometimes she'd just sit in my living room; her presence was enough to give me the confidence I needed to feed my babies. I watched them grow and thrive on my milk. By the time they were 8 months old I knew I wanted to help other women like the nurse that had helped me. Breastfeeding wasn't just feeding, it was a way of parenting. I couldn't imagine things any other way. With the nurses support, I became an LLL Leader & 3 years later an IBCLC.

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